What Evidence Is Needed to Prove Domestic Violence by Strangulation in Texas?

May 12th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Domestic Violence

Domestic violence allegations can quickly lead to felony charges depending on the circumstances. Under Texas law, it is a second-degree felony when a person previously convicted of domestic violence is later charged with “intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly impeding the normal breathing or circulation of the blood of” a family member “by applying pressure to the […]

Read More →

Is Misusing a Company Credit Card Actually a Crime?

May 5th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Criminal Defense

“Theft” is the criminal offense of appropriating property without the owner’s consent. Not all theft involves violence, mind you. Simply taking money that belongs to someone else qualifies as theft. Indeed, there are cases in Texas where individuals are charged, tried, and convicted of committing theft against their own employers based on the misuse of […]

Read More →

Can I Be Charged with a Misdemeanor for Filing a False Police Report?

April 22nd, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Misdemeanor Crimes

Lying to the police is not just a bad idea. It can land you in serious legal trouble. Filing a “false report to [a] peace officer” is a Class B misdemeanor offense under the Texas Penal Code. This means that if you “knowingly” make a false statement to an officer–even if you are not technically […]

Read More →

Can I Be Tried a Second Time for DWI If the First Trial Ended in a Mistrial?

April 15th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in DWI

The United States Constitution states that no person may be “subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb.” In plain terms, this “double jeopardy” clause means you cannot be tried by the state twice for the same crime. So if you are acquitted by a jury of an […]

Read More →

I Just Received a Traffic Ticket? What Do I Need to Know About My Legal Rights?

April 10th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Traffic Offenses

For many Houston-area residents, dealing with a traffic ticket is usually their first interaction with the local court system. Many people in this situation do not fully understand their rights and obligations under the law. With that in mind, here is a brief overview of what happens after a police officer issues you a traffic […]

Read More →

Understanding the Right to “Confront” the Evidence Against You in a Misdemeanor Case

March 30th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Misdemeanor Crimes

In a trial involving misdemeanor crimes, the defendant has the same constitutional rights as in felony cases. This includes, among other things, the right to “confront” and cross-examine the witnesses against them in court. But the right of confrontation is subject to certain procedural limits. Houston Appeals Court: Business Records Not “Testimonial” A recent decision […]

Read More →

How Throwing a Beer Can at Your Partner Can Land You in Jail for 25 Years

March 16th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Domestic Violence

A conviction on domestic violence charges can land you in prison for a very long time. Defendants often face an uphill battle in these cases due to the emotionally charged nature of domestic (or family) violence allegations. This is why it is essential to make sure police and prosecutors follow the law when it comes […]

Read More →

Supreme Court Clarifies Standard for “Preserving” Objection in Criminal Appeals

March 3rd, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Criminal Defense

If you are on trial for a criminal offense, the judge may make a number of decisions that you disagree with. Some of these decisions may seriously affect the outcome of the trial itself. As the defendant, you (or more commonly, your attorney) must object or otherwise bring a possible error to the judge’s attention […]

Read More →

Houston Man Convicted of Filing Fraudulent Tax Returns on Behalf of Foreign Oil & Gas Workers

February 27th, 2020 by Tad Nelson in White Collar Crime

Tax crimes are among the most commonly prosecuted forms of white collar crimes in Texas. Indeed, one of the easiest ways to find yourself in the crosshairs of the IRS or the U.S. Attorney’s office is to file a fraudulent tax return–or even worse, to file multiple such returns on behalf of other people. This […]

Read More →

The Role of “Outcry Witnesses” in Texas Sex Crimes Prosecutions

February 21st, 2020 by Tad Nelson in Sex Crime

Hearsay statements are generally not admissible in criminal trials. Hearsay refers to any out-of-court statement offered to prove the truth of the matter asserted. For example, if a prosecutor wanted to prove that John committed murder, she could not have Luke testify that “Mark told me that John committed the murder.” Luke’s statement would be […]

Read More →