The Risks of Volunteering Too Much Information to Police in a Drug Possession Case

June 5th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Drug Crime

When it comes to possible drug charges, the less you say to the police, the better. There is a good reason criminal defense lawyers constantly tell their clients to never volunteer information: Even seemingly irrelevant material can come back to bite you at trial. Appeals Court Cites Defendant’s Own “Incriminating Statements” in Upholding Felony GHB, […]

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Can I Be Charged with Possession If the Police Find Drugs Near Me?

May 7th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Drug Crime

Drug charges involving possession typically arise from the police finding illegal narcotics on the suspect’s person. But what if the police simply find drugs in a room where you happen to be sitting? Is mere proximity to drugs enough to support a conviction for possession? To help answer these questions, the Texas Court of Criminal […]

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Is a Drug Conviction Invalid Because a Police Officer Committed Perjury?

April 4th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Drug Crime

A cardinal rule of the Texas criminal justice system that is that every person who appears in court must tell the truth. Attorneys for both sides also have an ethical obligation not to knowingly put a witness on the stand who intends to lie. But what happens when a police officer is found to commit […]

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Do Houston Prosecutors Need to Prove You Had “Exclusive” Possession of Illegal Drugs?

March 4th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Drug Crime, Uncategorized

We have all heard of cases where someone is arrested for drug possession when illegal narcotics are literally found on the defendant’s person. But what if drugs are found in an area that might be subject to the control of more than one person? Let’s say the police search your apartment and find cocaine. Can […]

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Can Houston Police Legally Search You for Drugs During a Weapons Frisk?

February 8th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Drug Crime, Houston Criminal Cases, Possession

Drug charges obviously require drugs. And police typically recover drugs when they search suspects or their property. As you probably know, the police typically require a search warrant to conduct such a search. But there are multiple exceptions to this general rule. For instance, if a police officer has “reasonable suspicion” to suspect someone is […]

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