Texas Prosecutors Make Aggressive Use of “Human Trafficking” Law to Address Sex Crimes

November 19th, 2021 by Tad Nelson in Criminal Defense, Sex Crime

Human trafficking–also known as sex trafficking–is traditionally understood to mean “the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act,” according to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Sex trafficking is normally associated with the act of transporting someone across state or international lines for the purposes of […]

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3 Quick Facts About Texas Romeo & Juliet Laws

July 23rd, 2021 by Tad Nelson in Criminal Defense, Sex Crime, Sexual Assault

You probably do not expect the ill-fated heroes from a Shakespearean tragedy to come to your rescue when charged with a sex offense, but Texas’ Romeo and Juliet statutes may provide a defense. Knowing that sexual assault of a child is one of the most serious sex crimes defined by state law, it is a […]

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Sealing a Criminal Sex Offense Record

March 23rd, 2021 by Tad Nelson in Sex Crime

Under Texas law, those who are convicted of certain criminal offenses could qualify to have their record sealed at a later date. This means that most employers and members of the public wouldn’t have access to those records. Determining whether you qualify to have your own criminal record sealed can be difficult, so if you […]

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How “Promoting” Prostitution Can Lead to Serious Felony Charges

May 28th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Sex Crime

Even when it involves two consenting parties, prostitution is still classified as a sex crime in Texas. Similarly, it is a crime to “promote” prostitution by acting as a middleman or forcing someone to engage in prostitution against their will. And when alleged promotion of prostitution involves minors, Texas prosecutors will make every effort to […]

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Can a Texas Jury “Infer” the Timeline of a Defendant’s Alleged Sexual Abuse?

April 24th, 2019 by Tad Nelson in Sex Crime

Many sex offenses and sex crimes have very specific definitions under Texas law. So when a particular offense includes certain elements, it is the prosecutor’s job to prove each element “beyond a reasonable doubt.” Neither the prosecutor nor the judge can ask a jury to “infer” the existence of certain elements without the requisite proof. […]

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